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Landscape of Peruvian city.

Ecological Concerns in Peru and the Issue of Trauma

June 8, 2017

Mary L. FraserMary L. Fraser, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Pastoral Care and Counseling, Iowa Annual Conference

At Bocca Manu, Peru, the Manu River joins the Madre De Dios. We arrived in Bocca Manu after a time in the Rainforest of Manu National Park, where one does not need a religious text or a poet to remind the human heart that the sacred exists in all life. Our group consisted of concerned ministerial professionals, educators, doctors and two Peruvian guides.  We had come to Peru to learn about Ecotheology in a laboratory of living plant life, birds, animals, waterways, mountains and people.  Our task was to consider the relationship between our religious faith commitments and stress on the environment due to global climate change and human actions that degradate healthy environmental conditions.  We were to think about the theological implications and connections from our various fields of study and work; all of us were people imbued with higher theological education and held personal faith perspectives.  As we found ourselves at the hinge of rivers, the Manu and the Madre De Dios, I believe the powerful presence of the living earth, its creatures and waters, reminded us that the sacred tells a story simply in its essence, if we choose to listen, and from that listening, we may then begin to reflect, draw conclusions and seek to respond in hopeful and healing ways.

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